Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Soil - A Renewable Resource



Yesterday we discussed the ways that soil is essential to life on land. Almost every fiber of our being, with the exception of the water and the ideas in your head, is a product of soil. Yet, most of us have very little connection to the soil that feeds our bodies. We place a tremendous amount of trust in people that we have never met to manage our soil.


BlogWork

Go to the link and pick one of the articles listed. Provide your peers with an overview of the article. Be detailed in your description of the topic and provide your own analysis of the condition of the soil.

11 comments:

x| Jory |x said...

On July 23rd, 2003, a satilite took an image of a huge dust storm that was heading right on top of Utah from the West, towards the Northeast. It continued to go right over Salt Lake City and the Great Salt Lake itself. This was simply a dust storm, but a fire in South Idaho just added smoke to it and caused it to get worse. At that point, Utah became the driest state in the US entering its 5th in a drought.

Laura said...

In July 2003, the Western Cape of South Africa was experiencing a dramatic drought. As a result, the plants around the area began to die at an alarming rate. There was an actual visible change of the landscape from space, as the general color changed from green to brown. Primarily affected, was the agriculture of the Western Cape. Most of the country’s wheat is grown there, and there was defiantly a decrease in the amount of crops produced.

redrum said...

the north eatsern phillipines were experiencing a typhoon with about 6 inches of rain falling down with high winds at up to 85 mph. During this time flooding could also be noticed. The death toll was at 4

david said...

Dust Storm over Afghanistan and Pakistan

Dust storms aren’t good when they become serious and do a lot of damage. Like this storm that happened at Afghanistan and Pakistan. That storm was very severe. When I saw the picture the dark ridges of rock forms swirl over Iran. This storm was so bad that it forced millions of people out of their homes and killed many organisms in that environment. But these are just one of many storms that have occurred. Their have been storms in The Gulf of Oman, Lake Chad, Off Morocco, and Off West Africa. Their has been several others also. They seem to just never stop.
22

Kashi said...

Dust is blowing off the shores of Morocco and into the ocean. From space, you can easily see it spilling into the water. The soil is obviously dry and sandy. This soil is not healthy for supporting life.

mike said...

I did "Dust Blowing off West Africa." This article is about some dust the is from the Saharan that blows west over the Atlantic ocean. A couple islands get hit by the dust too. The dust was traveling for five days. This was seen from satellite pictures.

callieangelbuffy said...

the western cape of South Africa in july year 2003 experianced a drought that led to the deathes of many many plants. The wheat and agriculture was heavily affected. Making the landscape change from green to brown.

Jiggles said...

Rite above asia there is a very large dust cloud that is very large. It looks like a very big dark brown cloud blob that is slowly moving to across the yellow sea and also moving to southern japan. But when you look at the places with snow the clouds are white and do not have much yellow/brown in it

Eli said...

On June 2, 2003, the international space station took a picture of the nile river. You can see the difference between the green floodplain and the dry desert surrounding it.

Maximus said...

A River flooded in northeast Ethiopia. About 19,480 square kilometers of land were flooded. About 7,000 people were forced out of their homes and hundreds of animals were swept away by the water. I think the soil will be extremely saturated so saturated that the ground would not be able to hold all the water. So it would ex spell the water back out of the ground. I also think that a lot of the many bugs (microscopic and non microscopic) would die.

Chaz said...

On November First, 2003, a typhoon attacked the Northern Phillipines. It created a huge flood that killed at least four people. There were at least six inches of rain due to the
massive flood.