Tuesday, February 28, 2012

What's so funny!?!


Yesterday I assigned the class a challenging question to reflect upon. Why do we laugh? What purpose does humor serve us and why did we evolve to have it? I thought we had some great responses to that question, but also know that some people really struggled to think of the ways that it might benefit people. Is it possible that it serves absolutely no purpose? Perhaps it is what it is and we shouldn't over-analyze it. Possibly.

Here is an article written on the subject for those of you who are curious. Why Do We Laugh?
Read this and comment on it for extra credit.


9 comments:

ich ben ine berliner said...

I read this article while reaserching last night's homework. I think it's funny that you would post this for us to comment on.

I think it's really neat how we are all born with the ability to laugh. Also, think about what your laungage has in common with someone who speaks swahili. Bet you didnt think of laughter, huh? (O.K., you might've thought that, but only because I'm writing about laughter.)

i am a jelly doughnut said...

In diesem Artikel beim Reaserching letzte Nacht Hausaufgaben. Ich denke, es ist lustig, dass Sie dies für uns zu kommentieren einstellen würde.


Ich denke, dass es wirklich nett ist, wie wir alle geboren sind mit der Fähigkeit zu lachen. Überlegen Sie auch, was Ihre Laungage mit jemand spricht Swahili hat. Wette, Sie lachen, nicht wahr nicht denken? (O.K., Sie könnten, die aber nur gedacht weil ich über lachen schreibe.)

Harrison said...

I thought this article was really interesting. It is true: we all are born with the capacity to laugh. I never thought of laughing as the universal language before, but it does make perfect sense. (This is coming from a person who laughs a lot by the way.:D) Laughing is definitely contagious. Almost whenever someone near me is laughing, I laugh to. It's really cool that this happens this way.

A L said...

Its true that when you even hear someone laugh or talk about laughing, it causes someone to laugh because when i was reading this article to my mom she started to giggle and then laugh. I like it how laughing is a was of communication. Its also interesting how if you tell someone to laugh then they cant on command.

Ari said...

I think that it is intrusting that no matter where you go if you laugh some one else will laugh because the brain when confronted with the sound of laughter laughs along. Also after laughing we feel more connected to the other people. I also like that before we talk we laugh which adds a positive to the usual crying sound. I also think that it is cool that from panting the modern sound of laughing emerged.

danceMAGICdance said...

The article talks about the science of laughter. People don't genuinely laugh on command—they laugh whenever. Laughter isn't taught, it's natural. Even animals do it. I laugh a lot, sometimes so much my laugh becomes silent and I hiccup. The article was very interesting, but I wonder why we're studying biomes and you bring this up.

Jai-Lynn said...

I think it is interesting that most of the laughing people do is at ages 5 and 6, but I do see why. It's also nice how there is one thing that every language has one thing in common, laughter.

lawandorder said...

I thought it was very interesting that the research described in the article noticed that chimps or gorillas have there own form of laughter. I also liked that the article talked about the different between laughing with and laughing at someone. I was wondering why we laugh at others when we discussed laughter in class. The article said that it could be because we are trying to exclude someone or because we are trying to force someone to join into our group and be like us. I think the article was right and that laughing at someone is done to intimidate them.

PILLOW PETS (Is this name obvious enough?) said...

This article was about the science behind laughing. It described how people are born with the ability to laugh, instead of being taught. I always assumed babies learned laughter from their surroundings, because most don't laugh until after a couple of months, so I thought that was very interesting. Another thing the article mentioned was how laughter often isn't caused by humor, contrary to popular belief. They described it as a social glue that held the connections between people together and helped them relate to each other. Laughter is a form of communication tool, in a way.